Home Reviews Child’s Play (2019) is further proof why remakes are unnecessary

Child’s Play (2019) is further proof why remakes are unnecessary

Child’s Play © 2019 CopyRight All Rights Reserved.

2019 is the year of the reboots whether it’s reboots being announced or released, this year it’s very obvious there are many in the works. A reboot that made its way to theaters or not too long ago was Child’s Play.

If you haven’t seen the 1980’s original, Child’s Play is focused on a child, Andy, whose unluckily gifted a “good guys” doll named Chucky, that contains the soul of a murderer, Charles Lee Ray. As soon as Chucky kills Andy’s babysitter, Andy then realizes that the doll is in fact alive, but when he tries to warn people he’s institutionalized. Then It was all up to the mother to stop Chucky and his murderous intentions before he targets her son.

Child’s Play © 1988 CopyRight All Rights Reserved.

The modernized Child’s Play follows the life of a preteen boy, Andy (played by Gabriel Bateman) and his mother (Aubrey Plaza) moving to a new city. In result, Andy doesn’t have any friends so his mother decides to gift her son a Buddi doll to cheer him up. Crazy enough, Andy’s mother gifted him a glitched doll, named Chucky, (Mark Hamill) that just so happened to be the same doll a vengeful ex employee had taken the safety settings out of. Everything is all innocent and good fun until the Chucky doll takes on a life of it own and does anything in it power to remove anyone who gets in the way of Andy’s happiness. Once Andy finds out about his dolls intentions he’s set out on a mission to stop Chucky from hurting anyone else.

Upon viewing, I was surprised of how underwhelming everything in this film was. Seeing that it was a remake of the original Child’s Play (1988), I was expecting more out of it. Now I’m not saying that I’m a Child’s Play super fan and that because it’s Child’s Play, the bar needs to be set at all time high. It’s the fact that it’s a reboot and I have high expectations for reboots. I see no other reason for them to be made unless it’s brought to any form of justice.

Before seeing this film, I wasn’t excited about there being a reboot because sometimes filmmakers who make reboots don’t want to take the opportunity to add some more unique aspects to the film or have the previous viewers/fans in mind when creating it. One thing films like these do is make the one noticeable mistake which is taking themselves too seriously when there are obvious flaws peaking out. Reboots are complicated and can be done correctly if you put a lot of thought into what you are putting out. Especially having the original fans feelings or interests that made them fall in love with said movie in mind. But sadly this film made the many mistakes that most reboots have made.

What I can say the least bit nice about this film is that they didn’t take themselves seriously. In fact, that’s something I enjoyed about this film. It was more of a comedy than horror flick. But trust me, a couple jokes and “comedic” interactions won’t stop this film from being dull from the very beginning to end.

I found that this film didn’t add anything new or unique to this to make it anything but dull. Sadly enough, even the deaths and gore shown didn’t fulfill my need of adrenaline that I was lacking from the film. You could say that it was most disappointing part. I didn’t feel bad about any of the people who were killed because they weren’t presented in a way for me to like them. The way they were killed was so stupid and cheesy, that I was too busy thinking of other ways I would have written them to die than to care about what was going on during the scene.

It seemed that they had a good idea of what they wanted to put out but couldn’t really present it in a good way. Like the idea of the Buddi doll being an electronic device connected to everything in your home was very interesting and I was excited for them to dive into it. And I loved how they opened the film with a commercial kind of explaining what the doll is and what it does. The first three minutes started out very good. It’s just when you go further in, it shows that they didn’t really put much thought into how it works throughout the rest of the movie than what they did for the commercial, and that says a lot. The doll has no form of character and the fact that all it took for it gain its murderous instinct was a slasher flick was just lazy and stupid.

As far as acting, my favorite performance came from Aubrey Plaza and Brian Tyree Henry. You can tell they weren’t taking their characters that seriously and were playing around with what they had. They were very enjoyable to watch and were probably my favorite part about this movie.

Overall I really wasn’t a big fan of this film and I would honestly say in the kindest way I possible that I really wouldn’t recommend it. If you’re are looking for something campy and wanted to support Aubrey Plaza then please go to your local movie theater and see Child’s Play.

If you want my personal rating, I’ll give this film a 3/10.

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